Natural Sciences

Science and technology offer solutions to many problems in the world. With the industrial and life science products developed within our Scientific Solutions Division, we contribute to that. Furthermore, at Olympus, we believe in the power of innovation and work to foster intelligent ideas. That’s why our aim is to promote the development of young talent and scientists in pushing the boundaries of knowledge. We do this by supporting STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education as well as scholarships for scientists.

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Social Responsibility - Natural Sciences

In terms of research: frog skin in a magnified view, displayed with the Olympus FV3000 microscope.

Promoting talent, fostering innovation

Immersing oneself in a foreign culture, interacting with peers and building international friendships is a special and often formative experience for school exchange students. The horizon is broadened, new perspectives are unlocked and it is also a whole lot of fun.

In order to initiate permanent contact between Japanese and German schools and to inform about the Japanese position in the STEM education field, the Japanese-German Centre Berlin has established the JDZB (Japanisch-Deutsches Zentrum Berlin) Science Youth Programme for German-Japanese student exchanges. The programme is aimed at upper secondary schools in Germany with Japanese language classes, all STEM and STEM-friendly schools – those with a highly developed focus on natural sciences. Projects with science or technical themes will be planned and developed further with a correspondingly oriented partner school in Japan.

Olympus provides financial support to the programme, thereby aiming not only to support intercultural exchange but also scientific-technical projects among the high school students as lived out in daily life by some colleagues. Part of the programme also involves a visit to the respective company headquarters in Hamburg and Tokyo.

Find out more about JDZB

The Olympus Europa Foundation, together with the German Society for Digestive and Metabolic Diseases (DGVS), annually awards our Endoscopy Research Award in the field of endoscopy. It honours outstanding achievements in the fields of basic and clinical research. Aside from highlighting the achievements of outstanding projects, the Award also aims to increase the appeal of gastroenterological endoscopy for the next generation of medical professionals.

The 2017 winner

Dr. Peter Klare of the Technical University Munich received the Endoscopy Research Award in 2017. He was recognised with the Award and also received 15,000 euros for his research into capnography – a special technique used to monitor patients’ state of anaesthesia during an endoscopy.

In contrast to the method conventionally used in pulse oximetry, which monitors the oxygen saturation in the patient’s blood, capnography measures the amount of CO2 in the air exhaled. Klare discovered that breaks in or interruptions to breathing during endoscopy can be detected more easily and quickly with capnography than with pulse oximetry.

Capnography has long been the norm in general anaesthesia, but not in endoscopy. “Our findings show that it will be worth giving a lot of thought to making capnographic monitoring a standard method in the future, even for endoscopy under sedation,” Klare explained, summing up why his work was a success. He also explained that the prize would give him an incentive to continue with research in the field of clinical endoscopy.

The 2016 winner

… was Dr. Eugen Zizer of the Centre for Internal Medicine at the University Clinic Ulm in Germany. He convinced the jury, which was comprised of renowned gastroenterologists, through his work on the deployment of a so-called overtube system for use during endoscopic submucosal dissections (ESD), produced using a 3D printing process. His conclusion: the overtube system appears to make the ESD technique significantly easier and faster.